Today’s society. It comes with a tale of

Today’s society. It comes with a tale of injustice- injustice for anything that you can imagine. As for as the eye can see, we face the reality of intersecting oppressions, based on the foundation of sexism and racism. Through this paper, I will convey an argument that recognizing one’s identities and dimensions are key to a successful fight for equality. To further my argument, I will use articles from Kimberle Crenshaw and Gaye Johnson. Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color”, uses intersectionality as a theory that allows one to understand related systems of oppression while also being able to view power as multidimensional (Crenshaw 1242). Intersectionality serves to touch on the dimensions of race and gender in cases women of color. Johnson’s “Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity; Music, Race, and Spatial Entitlement in Los Angeles”, introduces the argument that the struggles, sounds, and spaces pushed Black and Brown people together in the fight for justice through the concept she names ‘spacial entitlement’. Spacial entitlement, according to Johnson, is a way in which marginalized communities established a new collective based on the exclusion from physical spaces, but also uses of creativity, spaces, and technology (Johnson 2).  As discussed by Crenshaw’s “Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color”, Chicanas are stuck in an in-between. They are neither white or male- the two identities that unfortunately equate to power- leaving them to identify as at least two groups in society that are inherently seen as less than a white male. Using Intersectionality as a tool to view the multi-dimensional aspects of a Chicana not only allows one to look at the connections between the systems of power that oppress those in today’s society, but also warrants the acknowledgment of the differences between identities, bringing them together, whereas ignoring the differences aids the animosity between the groups (Crenshaw 1429). In other words, by acknowledging one’s complex web of oppression, we are able to come together to create a stronger, more successful movement. Similarly, Johnson’s “Spaces of Conflict, Sounds of Solidarity; Music, Race, and Spatial Entitlement in Los Angeles” claims the shared struggles between African Americans and Mexican Americans pushed them to become allies despite the reality of them being pitted against each other for white approval. Black and Brown people have created communities in which they could share their struggles with identity and external oppression, creating a colorful and passionate culture with a great deal of powerful social movements using ‘spatial entitlement’ methods such as music. Black and Brown youth use Music as a means to share their narratives. The use of music as a counternarrative not only serves as a way for the youth to share their struggles but also as a form of intersectional resistance. Their music serves as the resistance to external oppressions like classism or racism, while the females also use music to resist patriarchal oppression. By using ideas like intersectionality from Crenshaw and spatial entitlement from Johnson, communities are able to understand differences between identities and multidimensional oppressions- being the key to a successful fight for equality. 

Comments are closed.